Tuesday, June 30, 2009

Today's lineup

1.Nomar Garciaparra
2.Manny Ramirez
3.Johnny Damon
4.Trot Nixon
5.David Ortiz
6.Shea Hillenbrand
7.Derek Lowe
8.Pedro Martinez
9.Brian Roberts
10.Jay Gibbons
11.Melvin Mora
12.Jerry Hairston
13.Jason Giambi
14.Alfonso Soriano
15.Raul Mondesi
16. Aaron Boone
17.Andy Pettitte
18.Jose Contreras
19.Roger Clemens
20.Carlos Delgado
21.Vernon Wells
22.Frank Catalanotto
23.Kenny Rogers
24.Magglio Ordonez
25.Sandy Alomar
26.Bartolo Colon
27.Brent Abernathy
28.Jose Lima
29.Milton Bradley
30.Casey Blake
31.Danys Baez
32.Craig Monroe
33.Dmitri Young
34.Alex Sanchez
35.Eric Chavez
36.Miguel Tejada
37.Eric Byrnes
38.Jose Guillen
39.Keith Foulke
40.Ricardo Rincon
41.Bret Boone
42.Mike Cameron
43.Randy Winn
44.Ryan Franklin
45.Freddy Garcia
46.Rafael Soriano
47.Scott Spiezio
48.Troy Glaus
49.Francisco Rodriguez
50.Ben Weber
51.Alex Rodriguez
52.Juan Gonzalez
53.Rafael Palmeiro
54.Carl Everett
55.Javy Lopez
56.Gary Sheffield
57.Mike Hampton
58.Ivan Rodriguez
59.Derrek Lee
60.Bobby Abreu
61.Terry Adams
62.Fernando Tatis
63.Livan Hernandez
64.Hector Almonte
65.Tony Armas
66.Dan Smith
67.Roberto Alomar
68.Cliff Floyd
69.Roger Cedeno
70.Jeromy Burnitz
71.Moises Alou
72.Sammy Sosa
73.Corey Patterson
74.Carlos Zambrano
75.Mark Prior
76.Kerry Wood
77.Matt Clement
78.Antonio Alfonseca
79.Juan Cruz
80.Aramis Ramirez
81.Craig Wilson
82.Kris Benson
83.Richie Sexson
84.Geoff Jenkins
85.Valerio de los Santos
86.Benito Santiago
87.Rich Aurilia
88.Barry Bonds
89.Andres Galarraga
90.Jason Schmidt
91.Felix Rodriguez
92.Jason Christiansen
93.Matt Herges
94.Paul Lo Duca
95.Shawn Green
96.Oliver Perez
97.Adrian Beltre
98.Eric Gagne
99.Guillermo Mota
100.Luis Gonzalez
101.Todd Helton
102.Ryan Klesko
103.Gary Matthews

8 comments:

Chairman said...

Interesting. There are a bunch of players who sucked for a long time, prior to 2003, though... For example Corey Patterson. If he was on the juice, then he needed to get better juice.

However, given the inclusion of Paul LoDuca and Bret Boone (who just happened to have ridiculous career years in 2001), are you finally admitting that your inaugural UPL win was tainted :-)

Greg said...

My hunch is that this list doesn't exactly match the elusive MLB list of 103 (or is it 104?) from 2003. But given what has already been revealed about that list and the seemingly large number of people who have actually seen it, along with the fact that players on that list are starting to admit to steroid use (i.e., A-Rod), I think it's only a matter of time before the real list does come out. When that happens, we can compare it to this one.

Regarding "sucky" players being on steroids, I suppose that brings up an interesting discussion. Exactly what role do steroids (or HGH) play in enhancing the performance of a baseball player? It's possible that steroids help some guys but hurt others (in terms of being effective baseball players).

As for 2001, I actually got some good production from Raul Mondesi and Jose Lima during that championship run, too. ;-)

Greg said...

Dang, I just looked up my '01 roster and saw Roger Cedeno on it, too. I guess you better put an asterisk by my name on the C-Lauff Dollar...

Chairman said...

Well, my philosophy is that if you're going to have juiced up players on your team, you should have the really good ones who have a compulsion to become transcendent (i.e., Bonds, Clemens, Manny, etc.). What I'm not as fond of is the crappy players all of a sudden become Brady Anderson, and then crashing back to earth. It's not so much a philosophical position, as a practical one. I just hate having to factor that sort of variance into my fantasy selections.

Chairman said...

I just took another peek at that list... not a whole lot of Reds players on there, I don't think. I, for one, would have preferred to have seen the Reds get more of these juiced players that could play, rather the retreads we kept throwing out there... Maybe a little juice for Austin Kearns would have jump started his career...

Pauly said...

No matter what the verdict, the only people who care about steroid abuse in baseball is the media.

Steroids sell papers, magazines and TV ads; but they dont affect ticket sales, do they?

Only silly baseball purists really have a problem with it. Personally, I rather enjoy seeing Sheffield swing it like he swings it; and I like it when somebody hits it onto the street or into the water.

People are very quick to forgive Petitte and Manny and Arod -- they make for better baseball. Only the schmucks like Bonds give the whole thing a foul stench.

Chairman said...

Tend to agree with Pauly. But, why is Bonds any different than any of the other guys?

Where I get a little annoyed is with all of the old timers bashing today's players and this steroid stuff. The same folks who used Amphetamines and acknowledge it with a wink and nod are now out there on a pedestal condemning steroids. If you look at some of the revealing stuff from baseball's history, the use of greenies (uppers) has been a part of baseball since the 1940's:

http://www.palmbeachpost.com/sports/content/sports/epaper/2006/04/02/PBP_AMPHET_0402.html

And if you read Ball Four, Bouton mentions them on a few occasions.

I get annoyed with this arbitrary line for things that we call "performance enhancing"." So, we're OK with injections for pain (cortisone). We're not OK with injections that help you train longer (steroids). We're OK with pills that reduce pain, but we're not OK with pills that increase attention and focus, or pills that increase awareness.

I mean, if you want to go old school, once you blew out your arm, you had to go pick up a trade. Now, we have people replacing ligaments with different parts from the body. That's definitely performance enhancing.

It just feels arbitrary and hypocritical...

Greg said...

Steroids sell papers, magazines and TV ads; but they dont affect ticket sales, do they?

Good point, Pauly.

People are very quick to forgive Petitte and Manny and Arod -- they make for better baseball. Only the schmucks like Bonds give the whole thing a foul stench.

But that's probably true wtih anything. When people tend to like you (for whatever reason), they're quicker to forgive. If they tend to not like you (for whatever reason), they tend to hold any negative against you in an effort to validate their original feelings.

If McGwire had tearfully broken down before Congress and admitted steroid use, then dedicated himself to warning children about the dangers of steroids and other drug abuse for the next several years, he might be in the Hall of Fame today--especially as voters start to realize just how prevalent steroid use had been (and the likelihood that Hall is already filling up with juicers... Kirby Puckett, anyone?).


Tend to agree with Pauly. But, why is Bonds any different than any of the other guys?

Two reasons: 1) Much of the media has always disliked his arrogance and 2) He owns two of the most cherished baseball records: Homers in a season and homers in a career.

Where I get a little annoyed is with all of the old timers bashing today's players and this steroid stuff. The same folks who used Amphetamines and acknowledge it with a wink and nod are now out there on a pedestal condemning steroids.

Yeah, this is definitely something I've noticed, too. Plus, how many ex-pitchers have we heard during TV broadcasts joke about the cheating they knew "other" pitchers would do--and then go into how one were to do it IF they were to do it--wink wink, nod. (Using nail files, spitters, etc.)

I guess where steroids stands out are that they can supposedly do more damage to your body than these other performance-enhancing measures. But then again, many legitimate jobs do damage to your body, such as being a coal miner.